European Members of UN Security Council, Joint Statement on Jerusalem, New York, 20 December 2011

The Holy Land: an Oxford archaeological guide from earliest times to 1700

    • Title: The Holy Land: an Oxford archaeological guide from earliest times to 1700
    • Author(s) / Editor(s): Jerome Murphy-O’Connor (Author)
    • Publisher: Oxford University Press
    • Year: 2008
    • Edition: 5th
    • ISBN-10: 0199236666
    • ISBN-13: 978-0199236664
    • Language: English
    • Pages: 544
    • Size / Format: 12,5 mb / pdf
    • Link: www.link.com
    • Password: falastinpress

Description: The geographic heart and soul of Judaism, Islam, and Christianity, the Holy Land has immense significance for the millions of visitors it has attracted since as early as the fifth century BC. Now in an exciting new edition, this popular handbook once again offers tourists an indispensable, illustrated guide to over 200 of the most important archeological and religious sites in the City of Jerusalem and the surrounding area.
Fully updated with all the latest information, The Holy Land presupposes little knowledge of history or archaeology, giving clear directions on how to find sites and monuments of interest–both well-known locations and those less familiar. With entries including the Damascus Gate, the Via Dolorosa, Mount Sion, the Dead Sea, Hebron, and Jericho, this indispensable book includes detailed maps, plans, and illustrations that further illuminate these spectacular locales. Each entry explains the history and topography of a site as well as its function and significance. In his introduction, Father Jerome Murphy-O’Connor provides a brief historical outline of the Holy Land, from the Stone Age to the Modern Period, and lists sites accordingly. The Fifth Edition includes new information on the crucial recent developments at the Holy Sepulchre and on six completely new sites, including a Middle Bronze Age water system in Jerusalem and what may be the original Pool of Siloam.
A marvelous Baedeker to both the city of Jerusalem and the Holy Land, brimming with practical advice and featuring more than 150 high quality site plans, maps, diagrams, and photographs, this book provides the ultimate visitor’s guide to one of the richest archaeological regions in the world.

Son of the Cypresses: Memories, Reflections, and Regrets from a Political Life

    • Title: Son of the Cypresses: Memories, Reflections, and Regrets from a Political Life
    • Author(s) / Editor(s): Meron Benvenisti (Author)
    • Publisher: University of California Press
    • Year: 2007
    • ISBN-10: 0520238257
    • ISBN-13: 978-0520238251
    • Language: English
    • Pages: 262
    • Size / Format: 1,7 mb / pdf
    • Link: www.link.com
    • Password: falastinpress

Description: “Now that I am seventy years of age, it is my prerogative to offer a summing up,” says Meron Benvenisti, internationally known author and columnist, Jerusalem native, and scion of Israel’s founders. Born in Palestine in 1934 to a Sephardic father and an Ashkenazi mother, Benvenisti has enjoyed an unusual vantage point from which to consider his homeland’s conflicts and controversies.
Throughout his long and provocative career as a scholar, an elected official, and a respected journalist, he has remained intimately involved with Israel’s social and political development.
Part memoir and part political polemic, Son of the Cypresses threads Benvenisti’s own story through the story of Israel. The result is a vivid, sharply drawn eyewitness account of pre-state Jerusalem and Israel’s early years. He memorably sets the scene by recalling his father’s emotional journey from Jewish Salonika in 1913 to Palestine, with all its attendant euphoria and frustration, and his father’s pioneer dedication to inculcating Israeli youth with a “native’s” attachment to the homeland.
In describing the colorful and lively Jerusalem in which he grew up, Benvenisti recalls the many challenges faced by new Jewish immigrants, who found themselves not only in conflict with the Arab population but also with each other as Sephardim and Ashkenazim. He revisits his own public disagreements with both Zionists and Palestinians and shares indelible memories such as his boyhood experiences of the 1948 War. In remembering his life as an Israeli sabra, Benvenisti offers a vivid record of the historical roots of the conflict that persists today.