Women and War in the Middle East: Transnational Perspectives

  • Title: Women and War in the Middle East: Transnational Perspectives
  • Author(s) / Editor(s): Nadje Sadig Al-Ali (Editor), Nicola Pratt (Editor)
  • Publisher: Zed Books
  • Year: 2009
  • ISBN-10: 1848131852
  • ISBN-13: 978-1848131859
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 294
  • Size / Format: 1,8 mb / pdf
  • Link: www.link.com
  • Password: falastinpress

Description: “Women and War in the Middle East” provides a critical examination of the relationship between gender and transnationalism in the context of war, peace-building and post-conflict reconstruction in the Middle East. Critically examining the ways in which the actions of various local and transnational groups – including women’s movements, diaspora communities, national governments, non-governmental actors and multilateral bodies – interact to both intentionally and inadvertantly shape the experiences of women in conflict situations, and determine the possibilities for women’s participation in peace-building and (post)-conflict reconstruction, as well as the longer-term prospects for peace and security. The volume pays particular attention to the ways in which gender roles, relations and identities are constructed, negotiated and employed within transnational social and political fields in the conflict and post-conflict situations, and their particular consequences for women. Contributions focus on the two countries with the longest experiences of war and conflict in the Middle East, and which have been subject to the most prominent international interventions of recent years – that is, Iraq and the Occupied Palestinian Territories. Issues addressed by contributors include the impact of gender mainstreaming measures by international agencies and NGOs upon the ability of women to participate in peace-building and post-conflict resolution; the consequences for gender relations and identities of the US-led invasion and occupation of Iraq; and, how transnational feminist movements can most effectively support peace building and women’s rights in the region. Based entirely on original empirical research, “Women and War in the Middle East” brings together some of the foremost scholars in the areas of feminist international relations, feminist international political economy, anthropology, sociology, history and Middle East studies.

Gender Equality and Women’s Rights In Palestinian Territories

  • Title: Gender Equality and Women’s Rights In Palestinian Territories
  • Author(s) / Editor(s): Sophie RICHTER-DEVROE (Author)
  • Publisher: European Parliament
  • Year: 2011
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 22
  • Size / Format: 0,7 mb / pdf
  • Link: www.link.com
  • Password: falastinpress

Description: This note gives an overview of women’s rights and gender equality in Palestine. It introduces the main actors, and then provides information on women’s status in the economic, educational, health, political, legal and cultural domain. It finds that, although advances have been made, women activists need to continue and be supported in their struggle against dual oppression from Israeli occupation and patriarchal control, if women’s rights and gender equality are to be secured in Palestine.

The Social, Economic, Political and Geo-Strategic Situation in the Occupied Palestinian Territories

  • Title: The Social, Economic, Political and Geo-Strategic Situation in the Occupied Palestinian Territories
  • Author(s) / Editor(s): Michelle PACE (Author)
  • Publisher: European Union
  • Year: 2011
  • ISBN-13: 978-9282337943
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 19
  • Size / Format: 0,7 mb / pdf
  • Link: www.link.com
  • Password: falastinpress

Description: The Occupied Palestinian Territory (OPT) is an exceptional case study in that the Palestinians inhabit an occupied territory and the project of state-building is still in the making1. One cannot appreciate the extent of the dire situation in the OPT without bearing this in mind. Since the establishment of the state of Israel in 1948 and the Arab-Israeli war of 1967, Palestinians have undergone massively destabilising and profound uncertainties about their political identities.2 The Palestinian dilemma goes back to 1945 when Zionist leaders initiated a campaign for a homeland of their own, demanding all of historic Palestine. Ignoring Arab protests, Washington and Moscow backed a UN resolution calling for Palestine to be divided between Palestinians and Israelis. A war ensured between Israeli and Arab forces (the Arab League threw its support behind the Palestinian resistance). As a nation-in-the-making, Palestine was erased from the map and Israel was created. Many Palestinians were forced out of their homes to make way for the new state of Israel. The six-day war of 1967 drove another wave of Palestinian refugees from their land. These lost lands of Palestine fuelled Palestinian nationalism.3 The Palestinian struggle against the occupation has been considered as a key explanatory factor behind the emergence of the Islamistsecularist dialectic in the Occupied Territory.4 The two most significant political factions in the Palestinian arena are Fatah (meaning ‘Opening’ or ‘Conquest’ and a reverse acronym from the Arabic name Harakat al-Tahrir al-Watani al-Filastini, literally: Palestinian National Liberation Movement), a secular movement and Hamas (Harakat al-Muqawama al-Islamiyya, meaning ‘zeal’), the Islamic Resistance Movement.

Israel’s Dead Soul

    • Title: Israel’s Dead Soul
    • Author(s) / Editor(s): Steven Salaita (Author)
    • Publisher: Temple University Press
    • Year: 2011
    • ISBN-10: 1439906386
    • ISBN-13: 978-1439906385
    • Language: English
    • Pages: 176
    • Size / Format: 1,3 mb / pdf
    • Link: www.link.com
    • Password: falastinpress

Description: In his courageous book, Israel’s Dead Soul, Steven Salaita explores the failures of Zionism as a political and ethical discourse. He argues that endowing nation-states with souls is a dangerous phenomenon because it privileges institutions and corporations rather than human beings. Asserting that Zionism has been normalizedorendered “benign” as an ideology of “multicultural conviviality”oSalaita critiques the idea that Zionism, as an exceptional ideology, leads to a lack of critical awareness of the effects of the Israeli occupation in Palestinian territory and to an unquestioning acceptance of Israel as an ethnocentric state. Salaita’s analysis targets the Anti-Defamation League, films such as Munich and Waltz with Bashir, intellectuals including Cornel West and Michael Eric Dyson, gay rights activists, and other public figures who mourn the decline of Israel’s “soul.” His pointed account shows how liberal notions of Zionism are harmful to various movements for justice.